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Premiere Pro 2017 Intel Core i7 7700K & i5 7600K Performance

Written on January 9, 2017 by Matt Bach
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Introduction

When Intel launches a new set of CPUs, the main question everyone wants answered is how much faster they are compared to the old models. In this article, we will be tackling this question in terms of Premiere Pro performance by examining how the new Intel Core i7 7700K and i5 7600K perform compared to the previous generation Intel Core i7 6700K and i5 6600K. Since we are currently recommending the "High-End" Core i7 CPUs in our Premiere Pro workstations, we are also going to include the i7 6850K, i7 6900K, and i7 6950X.

There are a wide variety of tasks we could test in Premiere Pro, but in this article we will specifically be looking at:

  1. Rendering previews
  2. Exporting to H.264
  3. Exporting to DNxHD HQ and DNxHR HQ
  4. Performing a Warp Stabilize Analysis

If you would rather skip over our analysis of the benchmarks, feel free to jump right to the conclusion section.

Test Setup

To see how the new Core i7 7700K and i5 7600K perform in Premiere Pro, we used the following configurations:

These test configurations include three different platforms along with seven different CPU models. For Premiere Pro, we typically would recommend a "High-End" Core i7 CPU with 6-10 cores so while the i7 7700K and i5 7600K are the focus of this article, much of our analysis will be centered on how they compare to the higher core count CPUs.

The media files we will be using come from a variety of sources. Many of these are available for public download, while others were graciously provided for us to use in our Premiere Pro testing:

Resolution Codec FPS Source Average Bitrate
1080p H.264 59.94 Jerry Berg
Barnacules Nerdgasm
30.2 Mbps (3.8 MB/s)
1080p ProRes 422 23.976 ARRI
AMIRA Sample Footage
133 Mbps (16.6 MB/s)
1080p ProRes 4444 23.976 ARRI
AMIRA Sample Footage
281 Mbps (35.1 MB/s)
1080p DNxHD HQ 23.976 Re-encoded from ProRes 4444 181 Mbps (22.6 MB/s)
4K H.264 29.97 Jerry Berg
Barnacules Nerdgasm
60.2 Mbps (7.5 MB/s)
4K ProRes 422HQ 24 Grant Petty
Blackmagic Design Forum
712 Mbps (89 MB/s)
4K ProRes 4444 25 ARRI
AMIRA Sample Footage
941 Mbps (118 MB/s)
4K DNxHR HQ 23.976 Re-encoded from Red 4K 702 Mbps (87.8 MB/s)
4K RED 23.976 Mike Pecci
Director & Photographer
220 Mbps (27.5 MB/s)
6K RED 23.976 Neumann Films
RED Dragon Test Shot
360 Mbps (45 MB/s)

Using these files, we will be testing a variety of different tasks which should give us a good idea of how the different CPU models impact performance in Premiere Pro:​

  • Rendering previews
  • Exporting to H.264
  • Exporting to DNxHD HQ and DNxHR HQ
  • Performing a Warp Stabilize Analysis

For exporting and rendering previews, we used relatively simple timelines in order to keep them as real-world as possible. In the past, we've loaded on the effects to show the maximum difference between configurations, but we found that this was not representative of typical real-world performance and in this case might introduce CPU or GPU bottlenecks. These test timelines consisted of:

  • 4-6 clips arranged in series to make a 60 second timeline
  • A basic cross dissolve transition applied between each clip
  • Lumetri color correction effect applied to each clip
  • Vector-based logo graphic added to the bottom corner of the footage

The warp stabilization analysis was performed on 10 second clips with H.264 1080p, H.264 4K and RED 4K footage.

Render Previews

Premiere Pro 2017 Kaby Lake i7 7700K i5 7600K Preview Benchmark

[+] Show full benchmark results

Overall Average
Performance

Compared to
Intel Core i7 6700K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6850K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6950X
Intel Core i7 7700K 105.6% 94.9% 86.6%
Intel Core i5 7600K 84.2% 75.9% 69.5%

Rendering previews is a good test in and of itself, but it is also a useful indication of how complex of timelines you should be able to play through without even the need for previews to be generated in the first place. Compared to the previous generation Intel Core i7 6770K, the new i7 7700K is on average about 5.6% faster. One interesting thing to point out is that while the i7 7700K performs at about the same level as the "High-End" Core i7 CPUs when working with a 1080p composition, if you make the jump to 4K you will really start to see a benefit from having more CPU cores. While on average the i7 7700K is only 13.4% slower than the i7 6950X, for 4K alone it is actually 21.6% slower. This isn't huge (especially considering the difference in price), but for most video editing professionals that 21.6% performance improvement should be significant.

Export to H.264

Premiere Pro 2017 Kaby Lake i7 7700K i5 7600K H.264 Export Benchmark

[+] Show full benchmark results

Overall Average
Performance

Compared to
Intel Core i7 6700K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6850K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6950X
Intel Core i7 7700K 110.0% 93.3% 84.6%
Intel Core i5 7600K 82.5% 70.3% 64.4%

When exporting to H.264, we saw a very decent ~10% increase in performance with the i7 7700K compared to the i7 6700K for both 1080p and 4K. This is still about 4-11.5% slower than the i7 6850X (depending on if you export to 1080p or 4K), but it closes the gap between the normal consumer Core i7 CPUs and the High-End Core i7 CPUs quite a bit. Compared to the i7 6950X - which is the best CPU for Premiere Pro at the moment - the i7 7700K is about 15% slower on average (5.5% slower when exporting to H.264 1080p and 31.7% slower when exporting to H.264 4K).

Although the i5 7600K is about 11% faster than the i5 6600K, it is roughly 25-35% slower than the i7 6850K. Compared to the i7 6950X, it is about 27% slower for 1080p and just a hair above half the performance when exporting to 4K.

Exporting to DNxHD HQ & DNxHR HQ

Premiere Pro 2017 Kaby Lake i7 7700K i5 7600K DNxHD DNxHR Export Benchmark

[+] Show full benchmark results

Overall Average
Performance

Compared to
Intel Core i7 6700K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6850K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6950X
Intel Core i7 7700K 104.3% 86.8% 74.4%
Intel Core i5 7600K 76.2% 63.6% 54.7%

Exporting to DNxHD HQ and DNxHR HQ is more demanding than H.264, which results in more significant performance gains with higher core count CPUs. This time, we saw only a small 3.8-5.1% (or an average 4.3%) increase in performance with the i7 7700K compared to the i7 6700K. Compared to the i7 6850X, however, the i7 7700K is about 15% slower. Going all the way up to the i7 6950X, the i7 7700K is ~25.6% slower for both DNxHD HQ 1080p and DNxHR HQ 4K.

Warp Stabilize (Analyze)

Premiere Pro 2017 Kaby Lake i7 7700K i5 7600K Warp Stabilize Benchmark

[+] Show full benchmark results

Overall Average
Performance

Compared to
Intel Core i7 6700K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6850K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6950X
Intel Core i7 7700K 107.6% 131.4% 137.7%
Intel Core i5 7600K 104.2% 127.4% 133.4%

Benchmarking the analysis portion of warp stabilize is new to our Premiere Pro benchmark suite, but it gives some very interesting results. Unlike rendering and exporting, this task appears to be either single or lightly threaded - meaning it does not take advantage of a high number of CPU cores. Because of this, the "High-End" Core i7 CPUs do not actually fare very well compared to the quad core CPUs. In fact, the new i7 7700K is about 30-40% faster than the 6-10 core CPUs!

Compared to the i7 6700K, the new i7 7700K is able to complete the analysis about 7.6% faster. Surprisingly, the i5 7600K is also faster than the i7 6770K by about 4.2%. We're not quite sure why this is since the 6700K has an equal maximum Turbo Boost frequency, higher base frequency, and supports Hyperthreading, but we verified the results multiple times and they were very consistent.

Conclusion

Overall, while the new Core i7 7700K still isn't able to match the "High-End" Core i7 CPUs when working with 4K footage it has some decent performance gains over the old i7 6700K.

Intel Core i7 7700K
Average Performance

Compared to
Intel Core i7 6700K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6850K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6950X
Render Previews 105.6% 94.9% 86.6%
Export 107.2% 90% 79.5%
Warp Stabilize 107.6% 131.4% 137.7%

Compared to the old Core i7 6700K, the new i7 7700K should be somewhere around 7% faster for most tasks in Premiere Pro. If you work with 1080p projects, the i7 7700K will actually almost match the i7 6850K when rendering previews and only be about 10% slower when exporting. If you have already made the move to 4K, however, the i7 7700K will be about 10% slower for previews and about 14% slower when exporting. Compared to the i7 6950X, the i7 7700K lags a bit more for 4K, coming in at about 20% slower for previews and 25-30% slower for exporting.

Intel Core i5 7600K
Average Performance

Compared to
Intel Core i7 6700K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6850K
Compared to 
Intel Core i7 6950X
Render Previews 84.2% 75.9% 69.4%
Export 79.3% 67.0% 59.6%
Warp Stabilize 104.6% 127.4% 133.4%

It might not seem fair to compare the i5 7600K to the more expensive i7 CPUs, but considering the price difference between the i5 7600K and the i7 7700K is only around $100 it is actually a very valid comparison. While the i5 7600K certainly held it's own in our warp stabilize benchmark, when rendering previews it came in at about 26.2% slower than the i7 7700K and for exporting the difference was even larger at 35.8%. While we don't show it in the chart above, compared to the old i5 6700K the i5 7600K clocked at just under 12% faster on average.

For professional Premiere Pro users, we would highly recommend considering one of the "High-End" Core i7 CPUs like the i7 6850K, i7 6900K, or the i7 6950X instead of a more standard quad core CPU. Especially for 4K and higher, these CPUs should be noticeably faster than even the i7 7700K and they allow for much higher amounts of system RAM to be used. If you do a ton of warp stabilization or just dabble in video editing, however, the Core i7 7700K actually performs very well for it's price - especially if you mostly stick to 1080p footage.

Tags: Premiere Pro, CPU, Processor
Fizzy Wagon

Hey Matt
Thanks for this - I'm anxiously waiting to get my new i7-7700K system - Running Adobe Premiere to edit 4K video - my current system is a complete dog and struggles too much - editing, rendering, encoding - so slowwwww

I have a drone and gopro which take 4K - I may be away on vacation or travelling and like the idea of editing on the road - however if I have to sacrifice performance too much - I will get a desktop

with a 1060 video card and i7-7700K CPU with SSD - will a laptop be suffice or will I forever regret not getting a desktop ? I'm hoping I don't have to upgrade for many years to come and by then there will be new Tech and not worth upgrading so having an upgrade path probably isn't that important

Thoughts ?
Thanks
Steve

Posted on 2017-01-28 05:32:11
gregge

What I'd like to see someone test on CPU cooling is take extruded aluminum heat sinks and test them. Then remove the heat sink, take off the fan, brackets etc. and glass bead blast all the surfaces except where it contacts the CPU.
Clean off, reassemble and reinstall, using the same method of applying thermal paste as before.

Why? Because the bead blasting roughs up the surface and in theory should slightly increase the radiative surface area. It also rounds sharp edges of the fins which may help airflow between them. It also removes any heavy oxidation from anodizing. The aluminum will quickly re-oxidize but very thinly.

Dull surfaces radiate heat better than shiny surfaces.

Does a blasted cooler work better or not? What about sand blasting? Sand makes a surface "toothy" and much rougher than the satin finish from glass bead.

So if you get bored some day and are wanting to benchmark something, try this. If you don't have a bead/sand blasting cabinet, there's probably an auto body shop nearby that does. Or use it as an excuse to buy a cabinet, for doing custom etching on computer cases. Mask, draw on design, cut out, blast. Works on metal, glass, plastic case windows...

Posted on 2017-01-30 10:20:49
Scott Bedenbaugh

That sounds like a project for the guys at Linus Tech Tips!

Posted on 2017-06-14 20:27:59
Scott

Thanks very much for this comprehensive comparison, you did a fantastic job. there is only one thing I'd like to know - and of course I don't expect the answer to be this detailed, a good estimation, a rough % value would do it:
how would the 7700k compare against the 6800k? for me it would be important to know, since it'd determine or at least narrow down my choices of motherboards.

Posted on 2017-03-02 08:39:00

The 6800K is just a slower (lower clock speed) version of the 6850K we tested, and while it also has fewer PCI-E lanes that won't directly impact video editing performance. The clock speed difference will bring it closer to the 7700K in a lot of situations where the 6850K is only 5-10% faster now, especially when working with common 1080P footage types. The 6800K would still be a little faster than the 7700K when dealing with more complex codecs or higher resolutions, but at the same time it will fall further behind the 7700K in situations where that was already faster than the higher core count processors - like Warp Stabilize.

Posted on 2017-03-02 17:39:56
Scott

Thanks a lot for your quick and informative reply, I appreciate that, big. I'll probably stick with the 7700k then. I'm still a little nervous about the switch to the PC world (from Macs), about how I'm gonna like it, but I guess it's gonna be fine. :)

Posted on 2017-03-04 08:53:23
Craig Ricker

Am I better getting a faster i7-6950x CPU or the slower Xeon E5-2697v4 CPU with a slower base clock (higher turbo) but 8 more cores. This will be used for video editing in premiere and AE compositions with 4k material. The Xeon is about $1000 more, but lets put that money part of the equation out of the picture. What is better?

Posted on 2017-03-15 04:20:09