#Fail
Chris Stephens (Business Development)

#Fail

Posted on January 29, 2013 by Chris Stephens

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If you want to work at Puget Systems you have to be ready for things to work a bit differently than your last job. You see, here, we are obsessed about a few things and one of them is failure.  Everything and everyone has every failure, ever, tracked in our database.  Want to know what the failure rate is for a particular stick of RAM?  We know it.  Want to know how many times your favorite employee has forgotten to add the required build notes to an order?  We document their every transgression.  We fail things for even the most seemingly inconsequential reason, right down to the smallest scratch you might not have even noticed.  Perfection matters.  Every week, during our staff meetings, all of the logged failures from the previous week are listed for everyone to see and you get to share with everyone your epic fail.

Tough stuff for the Puget staff, huh?

Not really.  Nobody is running around, ducking for cover, while avoiding the axe from Jon.  Although that might make for an interesting game it’s not what we do all of this for…it’s for you.

“For what?  My entertainment?” you might ask.  Nope, for your future sanity.

We work very hard to be the place that is honest about itself and its products.  We don’t offer a bunch of different components in our configure pages because, frankly, there is a lot of garbage out there.  We all have been burned by it.  Puget Labs is our answer to how to handle all the product hype. But for us failure is really more about discovering reliability than identifying failure, which means greater reliability in the Puget Certified System you buy.  Obsessed may seem like strong word when describing our pursuit of reliability, but I think it is an accurate one.  All of our Certified Systems are spec’d with the most reliable components we can get our hands on.  All of this is based on the product qualification done in Labs and the historical failure data we track. Although you will find all of our Puget Certified Systems to be extremely reliable, the Obsidian is the best representation of the work that has been done tracking and refining our build specs.  This system is specifically designed to contain only the most reliable components in our configuration pages. We are so confident in this system that if it fails in warranty we just send you another one.

Failure tracking is a feature that is available to you and we are working on some changes to categorize the types of failures for better data.  When you connect with one of our consultants they can tell you the failure rate of any component we have ever sold.  Take us up on the offer and learn the mistakes we have already made for you.  We know that the more reliable system you buy then a happier customer you will be.

Want to know how good that RAM is?  Are you worried you are buying another brick of a drive?  Just ask your Puget consultant; we would be glad to help.


Tags: fail, Puget Labs, Certified Systems, Obsidian, Product Development


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Preston_B

Thanks for the enlightening post, Chris. From the first day I looked at Puget Systems I knew your company had the customer at heart. When I looked at the various systems you offer, I was impressed with the Obsidian and the failure rates posted right there on the page.

My Puget computer is based on the Obsidian Workstation, and I must say it's been a high performance workhorse.

I knew that Puget Systems tracked such things as failures, but I wasn't sure how much they did until I ordered my computer and kept an eye on the progress of the build. During testing, the MB was causing the machine to lock up. So, Puget replaced the failed board, and rebuilt the computer.

This caused a shipping delay, of course, but my machine has been running flawlessly, every day, since May of 2011! I think this speaks volumes to Puget's committment to quality.

When I am ready to replace my other machine (an older Dell) it will be with a Puget Sytems computer; probably and Obsidian.

--Preston

Posted on 2013-02-01 17:35:04
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