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william.george
customer service lead


  

THEN: - before Puget -
In my earlier career, I held a variety of positions - from copy shop assistant to cast member at Walt Disney World. I worked with computers in one capacity or another for over 17 years prior to joining the company.

NOW: - here at Puget -
I signed on at Puget Systems in October of 2005, as the company needed someone dedicated to overseeing inventory and computer assembly. I soon found my niche here in sales and customer service, where I have been helping folks configure and purchase systems since late 2006, while also writing various technical articles for the company.

MY FIRST COMPUTER:
The first system I used was an IBM Personal Computer, running the 8086 processor. It had a pair of 5.25" floppy drives, one of which my dad replaced with a 30MB hard drive. We ran DOS on it, of course - though I can't remember now which exact version of MS-DOS it was (I think it was upgraded at least once). The thing still runs, actually, though it is rarely used now. The first computer I actually owned was a similar setup I was given as a child, but using the 8088 processor with turbo mode.

MY DREAM COMPUTER:
Hmm, I guess this will constantly change - but right now it would be an Intel Core i5, lots of RAM, and a fast but quiet video card (like the Asus DirectCU series) running in a quiet case (like the Antec P183). I love quiet computers, and I'm not far off that with my current system - so maybe I'm already 'living the dream?' :)

RECOMMENDED SOFTWARE/GAME(S):
Windows 7 & 8.1, the Total War series of games for folks who like strategy, Portal for those who like puzzles, MechWarrior Online for those who like big robots, Lord of the Rings Online for those who like the books, Skyrim for those who like RPGs, Path of Exile for those who like the Diablo series, and Star Citizen for those who like space sims.

LIFE: - outside Puget's walls -
I reside with my lovely wife Rose, our children Gus, Ruby and Milo, and our rather spoiled dog Ringo. I enjoy movies, games, and reading, along with working on computers (even in my time off!). In recent years I have also become an avid blogger - writing on a variety of topics via my Blogger account. My family and I are part of Grace Church, and would love to invite anyone to come join us as we worship Jesus and learn to live in community with Him and each other!

HOMETOWN:
Seattle, WA


William George's Recent Comments:
  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    I have used this in conjunction with Windows 7 Media Center, and it worked well. It takes a few seconds to transition into from the main Media Center interface, but it is done in a similar style and the remote control functions I am used to all seem to work there as well.

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    If you are opting for either a high-end video card or a passive card in the Echo III, adding this kit is a really good idea. The added airflow is important if the video card has no fan, and even if it does the added intake of cool air can help keep the video card's fan from spinning up as loud... so the maximum noise level of the system will actually be *lower* with this kit installed than without it.

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    This comes with a fairly short USB 3.0 cable - only about 16 inches long. That is fine for use with a laptop, but it wouldn't usually reach from a computer on the floor up to a desk. Just a heads-up :)

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    There is no eject button for the optical drive on this case, because there is no standard for where the eject button should be physically located on slot-loading drives. To eject a disc, then, you would use the command from within your operating system. For Windows based systems, that means right-clicking on the drive in Explorer and selecting 'Eject'. You may also be able to initiate that command more easily from within media playback software.

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    This should be able to handle powering almost any single-GPU video card, but I would not recommend it for use with dual GPU cards. Of course, such cards would probably be too hot to put in a small chassis to begin with.

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    This card has a ton of graphics processing power, but the limiting factor is the 4GB of memory per GPU. At high resolutions and quality settings - 4K with high-end anti aliasing in particular - that will prevent the R9 295X2 from really reaching its full potential. This becomes most obvious if trying to run two of these cards together in Quad Crossfire. If you are running that sort of screen setup and want the best performance, consider two or three GeForce GTX Titan Black cards instead (as they have 6GB of memory per GPU).

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    This card has a ton of graphics processing power, but the limiting factor is the 4GB of memory per GPU. At high resolutions and quality settings - 4K with high-end anti aliasing in particular - that will prevent the R9 295X2 from really reaching its full potential. This becomes most obvious if trying to run two of these cards together in Quad Crossfire. If you are running that sort of screen setup and want the best performance, consider two or three GeForce GTX Titan Black cards instead (as they have 6GB of memory per GPU).

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    Windows 8.1 is definitely a step in the right direction with the user interface, returning some familiar aspects of it like the Start button on the desktop. The ability to boot directly to the desktop is also handy, since most desktop and even laptop systems are going to be more at home there than with the touch-centric Start interface and apps. Still, users who are accustomed to Windows XP, Vista, or 7 may be better served by sticking with 7 as long as possible. Now Windows 8.1 does have some cool features 'under the hood'. The Storage Spaces functionality allows easy setup of multiple drives as a large single drive, with redundancy as an option. Support for multiple monitors is improved compared to previous versions of Windows as well. Some features have gone away, though, like portions of the nice Windows 7 backup utility - and Media Center, a feature I use heavily at home, is only available via an add-on pack from Microsoft. For more of my thoughts on the original incarnation of Windows 8, check out this blog post.

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    Windows 8.1 is definitely a step in the right direction with the user interface, returning some familiar aspects of it like the Start button on the desktop. The ability to boot directly to the desktop is also handy, since most desktop and even laptop systems are going to be more at home there than with the touch-centric Start interface and apps. Still, users who are accustomed to Windows XP, Vista, or 7 may be better served by sticking with 7 as long as possible. Now Windows 8.1 does have some cool features 'under the hood'. The Storage Spaces functionality allows easy setup of multiple drives as a large single drive, with redundancy as an option. Support for multiple monitors is improved compared to previous versions of Windows as well. Some features have gone away, though, like portions of the nice Windows 7 backup utility - and Media Center, a feature I use heavily at home, is only available via an add-on pack from Microsoft. For more of my thoughts on the original incarnation of Windows 8, check out this blog post.

  • William George (Customer Service Lead) Says:
    Path of Exile is a pretty fun game, if you like the Diablo style of top-down action RPG games. It is rather gory, so I wouldn't advise it for kids, but has a good story and fun gameplay - either solo or coop. It is also completely free to play: the only stuff you can even buy is cosmetic or extra in-game item storage, nothing that can actually affect character performance.