Picuture of Donald Kinghorn

Donald Kinghorn

hpc and scientific computing

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THEN: - before Puget -
I have a 20+ year history with scientific and high performance computing that was nurtured by my educational background i.e BA Mathematics/Chemistry and a PhD in Theoretical Chemistry. My research in Matrix Calculus applied to quantum chemistry was computationally demanding and evolved at the time of the PC "revolution" and the birth of Linux. My first computer codes were run on early Cray supercomputers and various Unix workstations but when Linux and "commodity" PC hardware came on the scene I was soon involved with building "Beowulf clusters" and parallel computing. I went on to work with a small start-up company Parallel Quantum Solutions building and configuring small specialty Linux clusters designed for computational chemistry and later went on to provide custom GPU accelerated systems as a consultant.

NOW: - here at Puget -
I knew of Puget System years ago from when they had done their first oil-immersion "fish tank" computer. I thought to myself, "OK those guys are all right!" ... So years later after moving to Seattle and running into Jon Bach at Super Computing 2011 I started thinking I should talk to those guys and see if they want to venture into the HPC and scientific workstations ... they did ... and I was really impressed with the overall quality at Puget Systems, so, ... here I am!

MY FIRST COMPUTER:
That would be an HP35 calculator in the early 1970's. Programmed "lunar lander" on that thing and was hooked. The first "real" computer that I really was ecstatic about was one of Steve Jobs finest creations, a NeXT Cube that I used while in grad school. That thing was wonderful! and way ahead of it's time.

MY DREAM COMPUTER:
That's easy ... an exa-FLOPS supercomputer that programs itself by reading my mind! (ahh, better add auto error correction too) I also wouldn't mind having a "tablet" computer the size of a real "yellow pad" tablet with high resolution pen/stylus input. It would be nice to have a hand-held touchscreen tablet that you could read and annotate a full-size two column PDF file on ... or be able to write musical scores with a pen and preview/perform the score as you wrote it, yes, that's what I want. Now someone please make it.

RECOMMENDED SOFTWARE/GAME(S):
emacs and fortran ... really ...or maybe not... though, emacs org-mode is awesome and I want to try co-arrays on the Xeon Phi

LIFE: - outside Puget's walls -
I was a musician before I ever thought about science or computers and I still play guitar whenever I get a chance and I can still convince my wonderful wife that I really do need a new guitar every year. The Pacific Northwest is one of the most beautiful places on earth so any opportunity to get out hiking or cycling is always cherished.

HOMETOWN:
Englewood, CO


Donald Kinghorn's Recent Comments:

  • Intel Xeon E5-2687W V3 3.1GHz Ten Core 25MB 160W picture
    Donald Kinghorn (HPC and Scientific Computing) Says:
    The E5-2687W v3 is one of the standout processors in the E5 Haswell line. Two of these give you 20 cores and a high clock frequency (3.1 GHz). This will give great performance for a wide range of multi-threaded, numerically intensive, applications. It's what I use for testing application parallel performance. It has the highest power usage of the v3 line at 160W TDP but that power usage translates directly to performance and we don't have any trouble with cooling it in our systems. [ If you have a code that is memory bound look at the 6-core E5-2643 v3 with 3.3MB smart cache per core ]
  • JDS Labs OBJECTIVE2+ODAC REV B picture
    Donald Kinghorn (HPC and Scientific Computing) Says:
    Build quality is excellent and the headphone amp has lots of headroom (nice if you have high impedance headphones) It was really nice with well recorded acoustic instruments!
  • M-Audio Super DAC picture
    Donald Kinghorn (HPC and Scientific Computing) Says:
    This little DAC is a definite improvement over on-board sound in my opinion and it's really user friendly. I like that it's bus powered (no extra power connection needed) and that the RCA output level is controlled by the main volume knob. That's nice if you are using powered studio monitors, you can set your OS sound level high and control volume with the DAC for both headphones and the monitors. It's an easy recommendation for someone wanting a better audio experience.
  • Intel Xeon E5-2637 V3 3.5GHz Quad Core 15MB 135W picture
    Donald Kinghorn (HPC and Scientific Computing) Says:
    The E5-2643 v3 and E5-2637 processors should be of interest to users who have code that is memory bound. The 2643v3 has 6-cores and 3.33MB smart-cache per core and the 2637 has 4-cores and 3.75MB smart-cache per core. The other processors in the 26xx v3 line have 2.5MB smart-cache per core. Also, these two processors run at high clock speeds -- 3.4GHz for the 2643 v3 and 3.5GHz for the 2637 v3. For parallel applications that only scale well out to around 8-cores and need maximal memory performance these two processors are likely to give very good performance.
  • Intel Xeon E5-2643 V3 3.4GHz Six Core 20MB 135W picture
    Donald Kinghorn (HPC and Scientific Computing) Says:
    The E5-2643 v3 and E5-2637 processors should be of interest to users who have code that is memory bound. The 2643v3 has 6-cores and 3.33MB smart-cache per core and the 2637 has 4-cores and 3.75MB smart-cache per core. The other processors in the 26xx v3 line have 2.5MB smart-cache per core. Also, these two processors run at high clock speeds -- 3.4GHz for the 2643 v3 and 3.5GHz for the 2637 v3. For parallel applications that only scale well out to around 8-cores and need maximal memory performance these two processors are likely to give very good performance.
  • Puget Systems Acrylic Development Enclosure for NVIDIA Jetson TK1 picture
    Donald Kinghorn (HPC and Scientific Computing) Says:
    "Nice housing for your Jetson TK1. Keeps your cat from stepping on your board while it's on your test bench. I'm glad I have mine!"