Picuture of William George

William George

puget labs

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THEN: - before Puget -
In my earlier career, I held a variety of positions - from copy shop assistant to cast member at Walt Disney World. I worked with computers in one capacity or another for over 17 years prior to joining the company.

NOW: - here at Puget -
I signed on at Puget Systems in October of 2005, as the company needed someone dedicated to overseeing inventory and computer assembly. After a time I moved to sales and consulting, where I have spent more than nine years helping folks configure and purchase systems (late 2006 to early 2017). I also wrote various technical articles for the company, and in time was called on to move into our Labs department. I took on that role in April 2017, and now spend my time researching the engineering applications that our customers use, testing them on various types of computer hardware, and publishing articles and system recommendations. I look forward to continuing to help our customers this way, and I am excited about where both Puget Systems is headed in the future!

MY FIRST COMPUTER:
The first system I used was an IBM Personal Computer, running the 8086 processor. It had a pair of 5.25" floppy drives, one of which my dad replaced with a 30MB hard drive. We ran DOS on it, of course - though I can't remember now which exact version of MS-DOS it was (I think it was upgraded at least once). The thing still runs, actually, though it is rarely used now. The first computer I actually owned was a similar setup I was given as a child, but using the 8088 processor with turbo mode.

MY DREAM COMPUTER:
Hmm, I guess this will constantly change - but right now it would be an Intel Core i5, lots of RAM, and a fast but quiet video card - running in a quiet case, perhaps something in the Fractal Design 'Define' serie, and with quiet Noctua fans. I love quiet computers, and I'm not far off that with my current system - so maybe I'm already 'living the dream?' :)

RECOMMENDED SOFTWARE/GAME(S):
Windows 10 with privacy & update tweaks, the Total War series of games for folks who like strategy, Portal for those who like puzzles, MechWarrior Online for those who like big robots, Lord of the Rings Online for those who like the books, Skyrim for those who like RPGs, Path of Exile for those who like the Diablo series, and Star Citizen for those who like space sims. If you have space for it, I also strongly recommend the HTC Vive with Room Scale mode, and some great games for that include The Lab, Audioshield, and Star Trek Bridge Crew.

LIFE: - outside Puget's walls -
I reside in White Center with my lovely wife Rose, our children Gus, Ruby and Milo, and our rather spoiled dog Ringo. I enjoy movies, games, and reading, along with working on computers (even in my time off!). My family and I are part of Grace Church, and would love to invite anyone to come join us as we worship Jesus and learn to live in community with Him and each other!

HOMETOWN:
Seattle, WA


William George's Recent Comments:

  • EVGA X299 Micro picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    Please note that only normal DIMMs (not RDIMMs) are supported by the X299 Micro, hence the 64GB memory limit. Also, the PCI-Express slot speeds depend on the processor installed. Lower-end chips have fewer PCI-E lanes, so if you plan on using a lot of expansion cards please check with our consultants to make sure you get a CPU that will support everything you need.
  • Gigabyte X299 AORUS 7 (rev. 1.0) picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    Both normal DIMMs and RDIMMS are supported by the AORUS 7, though ECC functionality is not officially supported. Also, the PCI-Express slot speeds depend on the processor installed. Lower-end chips have fewer PCI-E lanes, so if you plan on getting a lot of expansion cards you may want to check with our consultants to make sure you get a CPU that will support everything you need.
  • EVGA SuperNOVA 650W P2 Power Supply picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    The cabling used by this power supply is the same as that used on the higher wattage SuperNOVA 850W model we carry, making it relatively easy to upgrade to a higher wattage later on if needed.
  • EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 TI 11GB GAMING picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    The GTX 1080 Ti is the fastest video card for gaming, as of its launch in March 2017, and it should excel in other GPU accelerated applications as well. It is probably overkill for gaming at anything below 4K 60Hz or 1440P 120Hz, but if you want the best then this is it (until the next generation of GeForce cards come out, at least). It should also do very well in scientific computing with single precision (FP32) calculations.
  • StarTech 2 Port Type A&C USB 3.1 Gen 2 Card picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    USB just keeps getting faster! The latest version (3.1) supports speeds on par with Thunderbolt and introduces a new connector shape: Type C. Those new connectors are going to take a while to catch on, I think, but they are starting to show up on some motherboards. If you need to add one to a system, though, this card provides one - along with a traditional Type A port.
  • Cyberlink PowerDVD 17 Ultra OEM picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    Windows 10 does not natively support DVD or Blu-ray playback, so if you want to watch those sorts of movies on your computer then you need software like this.
  • EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition iCX picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    The GTX 1080 Ti is the fastest video card for gaming, as of its launch in March 2017, and it should excel in other GPU accelerated applications as well. It is probably overkill for gaming at anything below 4K 60Hz or 1440P 120Hz, but if you want the best then this is it (until the next generation of GeForce cards come out, at least). It should also do very well in scientific computing with single precision (FP32) calculations. This quieter version is great in single-card configurations, but for dual card setups I would tend to recommend the reference style cooling which exhausts more of the heat out the back.
  • EVGA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    The GTX 1080 Ti is the fastest video card for gaming, as of its launch in March 2017, and it should excel in other GPU accelerated applications as well. It is probably overkill for gaming at anything below 4K 60Hz or 1440P 120Hz, but if you want the best then this is it (until the next generation of GeForce cards come out, at least). It should also do very well in scientific computing with single precision (FP32) calculations.
  • PNY Quadro P2000 PCI-E 5GB picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    This is a great mid-range Quadro card, which is ideal for applications which need a "professional grade" video card but don't require cutting-edge 3D performance. It also supports 10-bit color, so it is a great choice for Photoshop users with high-end, 10-bit capable monitors. If you don't fall into one of those categories, though, a GeForce card around the same price will give more raw 3D performance in most situations... or of course a more powerful Quadro model.
  • NVIDIA Titan Xp 12GB picture
    William George (Puget Labs) Says:
    I don't normally recommend a card as expensive as the Titan Xp for gaming, since the GTX 1080 Ti gets you about 90% of the Titan X's performance for several hundred dollars less - but if you want to have the best 4K experience with a single video card then this is it (for this generation of video cards, at least). Its real purpose, though, is for computational workloads that can harness the GPU: there the Titan Xp and its 12GB of memory really shine, and the price is more justifiable.